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Yemen's Saleh Lost His Life over Anti-Iran Stance

Yemen's Saleh Lost His Life over Anti-Iran Stance

"I am going to fight the enemies of the humanity and the enemies of our homeland who are trying hard to erase its identity and destroy its gains and humiliate the Yemenis", said Major General Ahmed Ali Abdullah Saleh, Yemen's ambassador to the UAE and the former commander of the Republican Guard.

Fighting erupted between the Iranian-allied Shiite rebels and forces loyal to Ali Abdullah Saleh last week, unraveling their fragile alliance, formed in the face of the internationally-recognized government and Saudi-led coalition. Speaking before the large rally, al-Houthi said that Saleh was "deceived... we hadn't hoped for what happened".

US-backed Saudi coalition forces renewed their attacks on Sanaa in order to back up Saleh's supporters.

Both Saleh and Houthis benefited from their four-year alliance as Saleh got Houthis manpower and firepower while Houthis gained from Saleh's governing and intelligence networks.

A video provided to AFP by the rebels showed what appeared to be a dead Saleh with a severe head injury, his body wrapped in a floral-print blanket.

The group would first start with restoring legitimate authority in Yemen and to empower the government of President Abd Rabbuh Mansur Hadi.

The move comes a day after the United Nations called for a ceasefire.




Saleh, who ruled in Sana'a from 1978-2012, had a strong following in Yemen, including army officers and armed tribal leaders who once served under him.

- More than 200 people have already died from the war in Yemen this month, with over 400 injuries.

They closed the ports last month after the Houthis fired a ballistic missile toward an airport in the Saudi capital of Riyadh, thereby blocking shipments of food and medicine and triggering broad global outrage. The loyalists of Saleh last week had proposed for the talks with the Saudi-led coalition fighting the Houthis to end the three-year conflict in Yemen.

Saleh's slaying likely gives the rebels the upper hand in the dayslong fighting for the country's capital, Sanaa.

Saudi Arabia and its allies struck a day after Saleh's son vowed to lead a campaign against the Houthis.

Without mentioning Saleh by name, he said that he knew about Saleh's communication with the coalition and his efforts to turn against the Houthis. The ensuing conflict has claimed more than 8,750 lives.

Houthi supporters massed in their thousands near the capital's worldwide airport, shouting "Sanaa is free and the state still stands!" and "Yemenis are one!" as rebel chiefs struck a conciliatory tone, declaring they were "ensuring the safety" of members of the GPC - a statement that stood in sharp contrast with the GPC's claims of a Houthi charge against them.