Health Care

Six Dead, 77 Injured in Washington State Amtrak Crash

Six Dead, 77 Injured in Washington State Amtrak Crash

At least six people were killed by the derailment of an Amtrak train near Tacoma in the U.S. Washington state Monday morning, local authorities said. Nine of the injured are in a serious condition.

"We've launched a full go team with all the different types of experts", said an NTSB spokesperson.

"No fatalities on the roadway".

"All of a sudden, we felt this rocking and creaking noise, and it felt like we were heading down a hill", passenger Chris Karnes said, as cited by Reuters.

The National Railroad Passenger Corporation, or Amtrack, said in a statement that there were 78 passengers and five crew members on board the train.

'Next thing, we're being slammed into the front of our seats.' People kicked out windows to escape, he said. All but one auto jumped the tracks.

"The tracks for this line were supposed to be upgraded to be able to handle higher speeds", he continued. Amtrak posted a number for people to inquire about any friends and family who were on Train 501.

Local officials had anxious about trains going at higher speeds through the curves in the area.




Local sources reported that Don Anderson, mayor of the nearby town of Lakewood, opposed the new route because of what he called insufficient safety measures.

"Come back when there is that accident, and try to justify not putting in those safety enhancements", he said, according to KOMO News.

President Donald Trump on Monday used a multi-casualty train crash to plug his promise to invest in the nation's infrastructure. "I'm not sure what happened", he said.

The new Siemens Charger locomotives were equipped with "positive train control" safety systems, created to automatically stop the train in risky situations and mandated for trains around the country.

Daniel Konzelman, and his girlfriend, Alicia Hoverson, were among the first on the scene after an Amtrak train derailed traveling along an overpass in Washington state.

The derailment occurred on the first day Amtrak trains began using the new inland route between the Washington cities of Tacoma and Olympia, part of a 154 million euro ($181 million) project to cut travel time.

At the time, analysts said positive train control technology could have prevented the accident.