World News

Trump puts off decision on Syria strikes

Trump puts off decision on Syria strikes

Opposition Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said it is "vital that parliament has the chance to debate and decide in advance" of any military action, which he warned "risks a risky escalation of the conflict".

"So striking at Syria is not a good solution, but doing nothing after the use of chemical weapons is even worse", he said.

May has said "all indications" point to Syrian responsibility for the attack.

Moisi stressed the "risk of escalation" of the conflict amid increasing concerns about a U.S. -Russia proxy war.

"But should the United States and our allies decide to act in Syria, it will be in defense of a principle on which we all agree".

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis warned that such an attack could spin out of control, suggesting caution in advance of a decision on how to respond to an attack against civilians last weekend that US officials are increasingly certain involved the use of banned chemical weapons.

In London, British Prime Minister Theresa May held an emergency cabinet meeting to discuss support for USA action against the Syrian regime.

But a special hotline for the USA and Russian militaries to communicate about operations in Syria is active and being used by both sides, Moscow said Thursday.

Later, May's office said she had spoken with Trump by telephone, and the two had agreed it was vital to challenge Assad's use of chemical weapons, and that they would continue to work closely together to do so.




Syria and Russia have denied using poisonous gas in Douma on April 7, with Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov saying that Moscow had evidence that the attack in Douma was staged. May isn't legally required to do that, though it has become conventional since the 2003 invasion of Iraq for lawmakers to be given the chance to vote before British forces are deployed.

Parliament voted down British military action against Assad's government in 2013, in an embarrassment for May's predecessor, David Cameron.

A YouGov poll published on Thursday showed just one in five British voters supported a missile strike on Syria.

The leader of the opposition Labour Party, Jeremy Corbyn, also speaking earlier on Wednesday, said parliament should be given a say on any military action May wants to take.

Following the meeting, May spoke to Donald Trump and the pair agreed that the United Kingdom and the USA would "keep working closely together on the global response", according to a statement from Downing Street.

Some MPs have backed Britain acting against Syria, warning that the use of chemical weapons was in breach of global law and could not be allowed to go unpunished.

Britain has launched air strikes against Islamic State militants in Syria, but not against the country's government.

Mattis addressed a hearing of a House of Representatives committee on Thursday.