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WH on Scooter Libby Pardon: 'The Right Thing to Do'

WH on Scooter Libby Pardon: 'The Right Thing to Do'

The person, who wasn't authorised to discuss the decision ahead of its public announcement and demanded anonymity, said the pardon has been under consideration at the White House for months. The pardon wasn't about Libby, and it was in Trump's interest not to disguise this reality. He came under investigation in 2003, after speculation that he leaked the identity of a secret Central Intelligence Agency operative Valerie Plame, to newspaper reporters.

Libby was given a 30-month prison sentence but refused a full pardon from President Bush, and the New York Times said that refusal soured their relationship.

Mr. Fitzgerald, who had the classified file of Ms. Plame's service, withheld her State Department cover from Ms. Miller-and from Mr. Libby's lawyers, who had requested Ms. Plame's employment history. He added that Mr Trump "recognised this wrong and would not let it persist".

Libby's attorneys, Joseph diGenova and Victoria Toensing, issued a statement thanking Mr Trump for "addressing a gross injustice" they said was inflicted by Mr Fitzgerald and Mr Comey.

Even the Libby pardon arrived hours following rsquo & Trump;Twitter attack against Comey s morning. So far, Mueller hasn't charged anyone with colluding with Russian Federation.

Plame spoke to MSNBC Friday.

Trump released a statement through the White House that he did not personally know Libby but that the man had been treated unfairly.




Since then, the Libby case has been criticized by conservatives, who argue he was the victim of an overly zealous and politically motivated prosecution by a special counsel.

The criticism echoes critiques of Robert Mueller, the special counsel leading an investigation into Russian election interference, possible coordination with Trump associates and potential obstruction of justice by the president. The president told the country that Iraq officials had attempted to purchase yellowcake uranium in Niger.

So when the ambassador, Joe Wilson, started to hear that erroneous claim being used to justify going to war with Saddam, he made a decision to speak out in an op-ed in the New York Times.

Libby was convicted in connection with the investigation into the leaking of the name of Central Intelligence Agency officer Valerie Plame.

The grand jury investigated the leaks. Manafort has since been charged with more than a dozen offenses, while Flynn has pleaded guilty to lying to the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Fitzgerald knew all along that someone else, Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage, had leaked Plame's name.